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Vol. 55 - 1999


Collaborations: tooltip

Edward Ruscha

Andreas Slominski

Sam Taylor-Wood

Insert: tooltip

Kara Walker

Spine: tooltip

Louise Bourgeois

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Critters Crave Salt

  • Author: Jennifer Higgie
  • Artist: Edward Ruscha
  • Section: Collaboration

Ed Ruscha’s Illuminated Manuscripts

  • Author: Jeff Perrone
  • Artist: Edward Ruscha
  • Section: Collaboration

Ed Ruscha’s Modern Language

  • Author: Howard Singerman
  • Artist: Edward Ruscha
  • Section: Collaboration

The Ballad of Ed Ruscha

  • Author: Joe Scanlan
  • Artist: Edward Ruscha
  • Section: Collaboration

White-out

  • Author: Katja Schenker
  • Artist: Edward Ruscha
  • Section: Collaboration

Berlin Detours

  • Author: Nancy Spector
  • Artist: Andreas Slominski
  • Section: Collaboration

Mouse Domes at the Periphery of Peopledom

  • Author: Patrick Frey
  • Artist: Andreas Slominski
  • Section: Collaboration

Wordless

  • Author: Julian Heynen
  • Artist: Andreas Slominski
  • Section: Collaboration

“SlominSki”. A Conversation with Boris Groys

  • Author: Bettina Funcke / Jens Hoffmann
  • Artist: Andreas Slominski
  • Section: Collaboration

Sliding.............S. Sam Taylor-Wood’s Invention of the Dialogue

  • Author: Francesco Bonami
  • Artist: Sam Taylor-Wood
  • Section: Collaboration

Sustaining the Antagonism. Sam Taylor-Wood’s “Five Revolutionary Seconds”

  • Author: Elisabeth Bronfen
  • Artist: Sam Taylor-Wood
  • Section: Collaboration

The Soliloquious Vision

  • Author: Ewa Lajer-Burcharth
  • Artist: Sam Taylor-Wood
  • Section: Collaboration

Hybrid Realities. Eija-Liisa Ahtila’s “Human Dramas”

  • Author: Beatrix Ruf
  • Artist: Eija-Liisa Ahtila
  • Section: Miscellaneous / Varia

Universal Wisdom at the Bewitching Hour on Private TV

  • Author: Rudolf Schmitz
  • Artist: Alexander Kluge
  • Section: Miscellaneous / Varia

Pavel Pepperstein: The Artist as a Subculture

  • Author: Boris Groys
  • Artist: Pavel Pepperstein
  • Section: Miscellaneous / Varia

Beyond the Identity Principle. The Anthropophagy Formula

  • Author: Suely Rolnik
  • Section: Cumulus

The Concept of the Original Is Obsolete. Wurm v. Forester

  • Author: Michelle Nicol
  • Artist: Ridge Forester
  • Section: Cumulus

$ 32.00

Introduction

Modern Art—Modern Life Parkett already published an issue eleven years ago with the collaboration of Edward Ruscha. It now gives us great pleasure to present many of the new works in word and picture, made in the intervening time, and to juxtapose them with two very different, younger artists. Is there common ground among such highly independent, idiosyncratic artists as Edward Ruscha, Sam Taylor-Wood, and Andreas Slominski? As different as their fields of activity and endeavor are, all three share a freedom and confidence in the use of their chosen artistic means as well as an interest in the surprising image whose magnetic attraction exerts an enduring mental impact. One would simply like to cite pictures without subjecting them to interpretation: the boy being fed on the cover and the “traps” (Slominski), the critters that crave salt (Ruscha), and the lasting impression of five revolutionary seconds (Taylor-Wood). It is obvious that, to a certain extent, the mind is here confronted with instinct. In addition, all three artists have a way of establishing an order, a layout of sorts, as a basis for structuring their works to direct our gaze in unmistakably premeditated trajectories. They exercise “the absolute power to direct another person’s attention,” as Boris Groys remarks in his reflections on “SlominSki”. While Ruscha’s lettering shifts so much content into the space of the picture that even the most uninviting cliff cannot remain unaffected, the immersion in what might be a moment of hysteria in Taylor-Wood’s photographs communicates the same implacability that issues from the terrible and single-minded intent of Slominski’s traps. The works of all three artists often act “as if”: Sam Taylor-Wood shows us large-format photographed images with predella scenes like the paintings on a medieval altarpiece, while Andreas Slominski’s actually operative “traps” resemble the sculpture of arte povera. And Ed Ruscha’s paintings have taken to billowing toward the viewer like cheerfully uninhibited sails or animated cartoon bubbles. Kara Walker’s “Insert” also toys with pretence. Her world of Biedermeier silhouettes opens wide the fathomless depths of eternally repressed emotion. The spine has been designed by Louise Bourgeois. (from the editorial by Bice Curiger, Editor-in-Chief)