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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Doug Aitken, the “Stalker” of this Fin de Siècle

  • Author: Christine van Assche
  • Artist: Doug Aitken
  • Section: Collaboration

Liquid Time

  • Author: Francesco Bonami
  • Artist: Doug Aitken
  • Section: Collaboration

Omega Man

  • Author: James Roberts
  • Artist: Doug Aitken
  • Section: Collaboration

Between Worlds—Nan Goldin’s Recent Photographs

  • Author: Arthur C. Danto
  • Artist: Nan Goldin
  • Section: Collaboration

Christine Floating in the Sea, 1999

  • Author: Lisa Liebmann
  • Artist: Nan Goldin
  • Section: Collaboration

Images of Intimacy

  • Author: Ulmann-Matthias Hakert
  • Artist: Nan Goldin
  • Section: Collaboration

On the Edges of the Image

  • Author: Elisabeth Lebovici
  • Artist: Nan Goldin
  • Section: Collaboration

The Party's Over

  • Author: Dana Friis-Hansen
  • Artist: Nan Goldin
  • Section: Collaboration

“Suzanne and Philippe on the Train, Long Island, 1985”

  • Author: Deborah Eisenberg
  • Artist: Nan Goldin
  • Section: Collaboration

Cheap Tricks. Thomas Hirschhorn’s Transvaluation Machine

  • Author: Alison Gingeras
  • Artist: Thomas Hirschhorn
  • Section: Collaboration

Reason in Conflict. The War of Différance II

  • Author: Marcus Steinweg
  • Artist: Thomas Hirschhorn
  • Section: Collaboration

Thomas Hirschhorn

  • Author: Robert Fleck
  • Artist: Thomas Hirschhorn
  • Section: Collaboration

Thomas Hirschhorn, You Are So Annoying!

  • Author: Philippe Vergne
  • Artist: Thomas Hirschhorn
  • Section: Collaboration

Surface to Air. The Collage Paintings of Donald Baechler

  • Author: David Greenberg
  • Artist: Donald Baechler
  • Section: Miscellaneous / Varia

Louise Lawler: Specters of Modernism

  • Author: Andrea Kroksnes
  • Artist: Louise Lawler
  • Section: Miscellaneous / Varia

John Miller

  • Author: Lionel Bovier
  • Artist: John Miller
  • Section: Miscellaneous / Varia

Fouiller entre les mots

  • Author: Juri Steiner
  • Artist: Annelise Coste
  • Section: Balkon

Fernando Melani: Art and Habitat

  • Author: Rudolf Schmitz
  • Artist: Fernando Melani
  • Section: Les Infos du Paradis

West of Everything

  • Author: Connie Butler
  • Section: Cumulus

Retrace Your Steps: Remember Tomorrow. An Exhibition in Sir John Soane’s Museu…

  • Author: Hans Ulrich Obrist
  • Artist: John Soane
  • Section: Cumulus

$ 32.00

Introduction

The Margins Within. Where can we actually find the much vaunted margins of society and what do they look like? Do they even exist inasmuch as we have supposedly lost our center and become one vast globalized culture? On studying the work of Doug Aitken, Nan Goldin, and Thomas Hirschhorn in this issue of Parkett, we are at once immersed in instant recognition. With striking immediacy, the works of all three artists bespeak what is commonly called reality. They demonstrate how firmly said “margins” are, in fact, rooted within ourselves, by confronting us with areas of life whose inevitably inscribed boundaries and points of transition define the everyday experiences of each and everyone of us, no matter how we conduct our lives. Thomas Hirschhorn adopts the visual language of outsiders that we encounter as pedestrians in urban conglomerations. He seems to capture the smoke signals of a poor, lost soul in signs and signals that are neither officially dictated nor commercially indicated, in cheap, dilapidated materials, and in expressions that are anything but streamlined. Too thin the pencil stroke, too emphatic the diction—a manifestation of pure, unadulterated amateurism. But Hirschhorn’s references are intentional and conscious; masterful and lucid, they are couched in a disquieting paradox that reveals the grand but inevitably doomed anti-program of the weak. Their subtlety lies in being directed both at the remove of the poet’s life as well as the hard, core business of society. They make cracks in the asphalt, as it were, and inflame our eager, art-oriented minds. Even though Nan Goldin’s photographs display with a “milieu” that may not coincide with our own, we are never placed in the position of being a voyeur. This pinpoints a salient feature of her art and explains why she enjoys such widespread popularity. Nan Golding is a participant of the pictures she shoots. And the gaze directed at her subjects is always loving, always warm. For this reason, when she photographs people in the nude, the effect is an existential rather than a physical nudity. It is a question of the gaze, of an attitude that conveys a communicative aura, and of other wrappings in the space around her subjects, in which they seem to seek sanctuary. The form, the careful composition, the lighting, the coloring create this inimitably dignified framework. In her essay Elisabeth Lebovici writes that Goldin’s more recent pictures of landscapes and nature are invested with the same communicative intimacy and do not describe feelings of distance or infinity. While Nan Goldin aims to demolish fiction with her unbroken faith in photography’s ability to bring us closer to reality, the work of Doug Aitken fuses with a reality that essentially takes place in the mind. The landscapes in his captivating video installations are both mental and real—the overexposed desert enclosed in a barbed wire fence (Diamond Sea), the island evacuated before and after a volcanic eruption (Eraser). The titles themselves are signposts as well, like Electric Earth or 2-Second Separation, or the Parkett Edition, Decrease the Mass and Run Like Hell: a searing, silver kite that rises into the air, a collective psycho-missile, detached from the minds of earthlings, converting a physical process into an emotional state, mirrored in the sparkling cold of the skies. The cover with its two different faceless figures embodies two introverted worlds that still sustain tension with the world outside. The museum door on the back cover has also been transported into the realm of anonymous personal expression with tags and stickers from Hirschhorn’s own inventory. In addition, this volume of Parkett has a surprise in store: contrary to custom, the layout of Thomas Hirschhorn’s section has been designed by the artist himself. (from the editorial by Bice Curiger, Editor-in-Chief)