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TABLE OF CONTENTS

The Chinese City Between Dream World and Catastrophe

  • Author: Tom McDonough
  • Artist: Cao Fei
  • Section: Collaboration

Cao Fei’s Avatars and Antiheroes

  • Author: Hou Hanru
  • Artist: Cao Fei
  • Section: Collaboration

Cao Fei’s, Performance Without Transcendence

  • Jiayun Zhuang
  • Artist: Cao Fei
  • Section: Collaboration

The Quiet Bohemia of Lynette Yiadom-Boakye’s Paintings

  • Author: Rizvana Bradley
  • Artist: Lynette Yiadom-Boakye
  • Section: Collaboration

Levitating Blackness: Lynette Yiadom-Boakye’s Right to Opacity

  • Author: Adrienne Edwards
  • Artist: Lynette Yiadom-Boakye
  • Section: Collaboration

The Kiss

  • Author: Hilton Als
  • Artist: Lynette Yiadom-Boakye
  • Section: Collaboration

My Flesh and Blood: Omer Fast’s Continuity

  • Author: Roy Scranton
  • Artist: Omer Fast
  • Section: Collaboration

Conflicts That Alter Our Lives

  • Author: Kaelen Wilson-Goldie
  • Artist: Omer Fast
  • Section: Collaboration

Iraqi Whispers

  • Author: Sven Lütticken
  • Artist: Omer Fast
  • Section: Collaboration

Rememberment of Things Past

  • Author: Mihnea Mircan
  • Artist: Adrian Ghenie
  • Section: Collaboration

Paintings Gags

  • Author: Suzanne Hudson
  • Artist Adrian Ghenie
  • Section: Collaboration

Adrian Ghenie, Painter of the Twentieth Century

  • Author: Brigid Doherty
  • Artist: Adrian Ghenie
  • Section: Collaboration

Aural Traditions: The Art of Jason Moran

  • Author: Naomi Beckwith
  • Section: Contribution

 

$ 45.00

Introduction

About the Now. Cao Fei, Adrian Ghenie, Omer Fast, and Lynette Yiadom- Boakye, Parkett 99 presents four artists who, with their experience of very different backgrounds, take history (and histories), dreams, the inscrutable, and at times even the disasters in contemporary reality and hold them up to our gaze.

Their representations and images capture fleeting, ambivalent, and always unstable realities in kaleidoscopic images, fictitious creations, and shimmering visions, without ever diminishing their truth content. Even if Cao Fei’s art paints a gloomy picture of today’s Chinese megacities, it is regularly illuminated by allegorical flashes of fragile life asserting itself among the rubble.

Theaters of war, traumas, and shocking stories from the newsroom seem concentrated through a particular burning glass in Omer Fast’s films, whose credo Kaelen Wilson-Goldie describes as “the disaster and the desire to surpass it, all at once” (p. 121). For author Suzanne Hudson (p. 163), Adrian Ghenie“proposes that one order may cancel another.” Mihnea Mircan considers how Ghenie’s images of decay, as poisonous “bestiaries” from 20th-century history, also contaminate our present (p. 144). It is in the dark color spaces of Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, that a glimmer of hope can be made out. Here Hilton Als finds the fraternity and closeness that in his view are otherwise lacking in contemporary art, as he shares in his engagingly personal essay (p. 86).

All of this is fittingly accompanied by the ghosts that appear as recollections of current events in Rokni Haerizadeh’s Insert a- haunting book-withina- book. Bice Curiger and Nikki Columbus