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Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster

Unique Collection of 14 color silkscreen calendars to simultaneously display all 14 prints (incl. two by Philippe Parreno) from Calendario 2020, 2007

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Description

This group of 14 silkscreen calendars fully documents Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster's Calendar for 12 months in 12 years (January 2008-December 2019). To view all 14 individual images click 2-15 below the image.
14 calendars, each containing 14 prints including 2 by Philippe Parreno, color silkscreen on Munken 350g/m2, paper size: 16 1/2 x 19" (42 x 46,6 cm) each, image size: 11 1/2 x 16 3/4" ( 28,6 x 42,6 cm), bound, printed by Atelier Lorenz Boegli, Zurich, numbered and signed. Please contact Parkett for more information.

A calendar in four dimensions, where the space of a year fills the time of one month.

Quote


"Gonzalez-Foerster has repeatedly used space as a central feature of her artistic practice. Her work hails from multiple places, sites, and milieus and is constructed from the storehouse of feelings that we all carry inside. It unapologetically alludes to emotional values while generating a sensible landscape within the spectator. From her vast body of work, it is specifically the environments that provoke the formation of these mental-affective landscapes, and with which we are here concerned."

Pamela Echeverria, Parkett No. 80, 2007

$ 14,500.00

About

“Providing insights into and voyeuristic perspectives of contemporary metropolitan life, the work of Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster possesses a beguiling intimacy and subtlety. Inspired by film literature, art history, and architecture, her cross-disciplinary practice includes installation, video, collaborative work, and film. Rather than attempting to make something new, Gonzalez-Foerster prefers to stage scenarios. Her environments – including her Parkett project “Calendario 2020, 2007”, a silkscreen calendar for 12 months in 12 years, with two additional prints by Philippe Parreno – aim to provoke emotional and mental landscapes in the viewer.” -Artspace