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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Aggressive and Cool

  • Author: John Yau
  • Artist: Charline von Heyl
  • Section: Collaboration

Mercurial Nature

  • Author: Joan Waltemath
  • Artist: Charline von Heyl
  • Section: Collaboration

Now or Else

  • Author: Mary Simpson
  • Artist: Charline von Heyl
  • Section: Collaboration

Movement Studies

  • Author: Doryun Chong
  • Artist: Haegue Yang
  • Section: Collaboration

We Can Get There!

  • Author: Jimmie Durham & Haegue Yang
  • Artist: Haegue Yang
  • Section: Collaboration

Still I Have to Write to Hide Writing

  • Author: Marina Vishmidt
  • Artist: Haegue Yang
  • Section: Collaboration

Ruinaphilia

  • Author: Jessica Morgan
  • Artist: Mark Bradford
  • Section: Collaboration

Kingdom Day

  • Author: Christopher Bedford
  • Artist: Mark Bradford
  • Section: Collaboration

A Range of Convergences

  • Author: Huey Copeland
  • Artist: Mark Bradford
  • Section: Collaboration

A Palpable Miss

  • Author: Philippe Pirotte
  • Artist: Oscar Tuazon
  • Section: Collaboration

Hard Work

  • Author: Oscar Tuazon & K8 Hardy
  • Artist: Oscar Tuazon
  • Section: Collaboration

The Poet’s Strike

  • Author: Eileen Myles
  • Artist: Oscar Tuazon
  • Section: Collaboration

Sound

  • Author: Kabir Carter & Alan Licht
  • Section: Miscellaneous / Varia

Unassuming Places

  • Author: William A. Ewing
  • Section: Miscellaneous / Varia

Mona Hatoums Silberstreifen

  • Author: Jacqueline Burckhardt
  • Section: Miscellaneous / Varia

$ 45.00

Introduction

Is expansive collage the right description? Is it the collation of materials and immaterial fragments, of par ts and splinters of reality, charged with a variety of meanings, that connects the work of the four ar tists presented here—Mark Bradford, Charline von Heyl, Oscar Tuazon, and Haegue Yang?

Bradford’s works are highly charged. The sur faces are scratched, scored, distressed. At the same time, viewed from a distance, they seem to capture the vast explosions of entire continents. These are works in which the shabbiness and violence of reality make unexpected acquaintance with the most delicate under tones of painting. They are teeming with dynamic energy and yet at the same time they herald the glittering, uneasy calm after the catastrophe.

Charline von Heyl’s painting, on the other hand, is geared towards a synthesis of associations that emerge during the thought process of their creation. Instead of soaring into the stratosphere, these works seem to course through the sensual and intellectual universe of painting to discover and revel in its (still) unrealized potential.

Haegue Yang combines mass produced objects, cheap impor ts, and everyday items such as dr ying racks, venetian blinds, packaging, lamp stands, and even smells, to create a whimsical parade of shapes occupying the exhibition space as “movement studies” of a higher order. Her sculptures have been described by Doryun Chong as “a microcosm comprised of crisscrossing routes of trade and migration from far off points of the world.”

Oscar Tuazon’s sculptures often coalesce with the exhibition space in startling ways. Strong, raw and hard, their def iant, wild autonomy possesses an aesthetic that might be described as the rhetoric of survival.

Archaic as all these responses to our technologically complex world may seem—OMG I-CHING, the insert by Karl Holmqvist in this issue of Parkett, is a fusion between the ancient Taoist oracle of the Book of Changes, I-Ching, and the smslanguage of the textspeak generation in which OMG stands for “Oh, My God!” The spine has been designed by Ernst Caramelle