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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Fifty Years Down the Road

  • Author: Pamela M. Lee
  • Artist: Robert Frank
  • Section: Collaboration

Reunion

  • Author: Eileen Myles
  • Artist: Robert Frank
  • Section: Collaboration

You Can't Go Home

  • Author: Tacita Dean
  • Artist: Robert Frank
  • Section: Collaboration

Double Negative

  • Author: Suzanne Cotter
  • Artist: Wade Guyton
  • Section: Collaboration

Pictures Eating Pictures. Notes for Wade Guyton

  • Author: Daniel Birnbaum
  • Artist: Wade Guyton
  • Section: Collaboration

The New Black

  • Author: Scott Rothkopf
  • Artist: Wade Guyton
  • Section: Collaboration

Adequacy, No! On the Process of Productive Perversion or Defacement: The Paintin…

  • Author: Jutta Koether
  • Artist: Christopher Wool
  • Section: Collaboration

Syntax for Minor Mishaps

  • Author: Fionn Meade
  • Artist: Christopher Wool
  • Section: Collaboration

Wool Gathering

  • Author: Richard Flood
  • Artist: Christopher Wool
  • Section: Collaboration

The End of the Gesamtkunstwerk. Susan Philipsz’s Sound Pieces in Space

  • Author: Burkhard Meltzer
  • Artist: Susan Philipsz
  • Section: Miscellaneous / Varia

Trembling Before Time: On the Drawings of Paul Sharits

  • Author: Paul Chan
  • Artist: Paul Sharits
  • Section: Miscellaneous / Varia

The Naked Nude

  • Author: Max Wechsler
  • Artist: Felix Vallotton
  • Section: Miscellaneous / Varia

The Treachery of Images: Christopher Wool and Wade Guyton

  • Author: Liz Kotz
  • Artist: Christopher Wool
  • Section: Miscellaneous / Varia

Immaculate Conceptualism

  • Author: Victor Tupitsyn
  • Section: Balkon

Cinema, Messianism and Crime

  • Author: Thomas Dylan Eaton
  • Artist: Kenneth Anger
  • Section: Les Infos de L'Enfer

$ 32.00

Introduction

Black prevails in this issue of Parkett. It is the gloomy, melancholy, existential black of Robert Frank’s photographs and films; it is the cool, urbane, subterraneously agitated black of Christopher Wool‘s paintings; and it is the black of Wade Guyton’s inkjet printer that seeks to link new and old. The black-and-white photocopy on the cover, an updated trompe l’oeil created by Guyton and Wool together, ironically plays to an antique gray.

The photocopy symbolically underscores reproduction as a self-made product, especially since the key to this kind of reproduction is not industrial multiplication. Instead, the artists presented here investigate different forms of slow, self-reflecting reproduction: mental and manual work that is related to the machine and to recent picture-making tools (cameras, standard stencils, screens, computers, printers). Guyton and Wool, incidentally, both cultivate a distinctive relationship to books and book-making that not only underlies their collaborative project for the cover but also provides the point of departure for Liz Kotz’s essay, “The Treachery of Images”. The hand and doing things by hand also play a role in the photograph that introduces the pages devoted to Robert Frank. Hands conjure and invoke but they also hold things at bay. The photographer’s largeformat pictures reproduced in this issue are film stills. Frank selected them specifically for Parkett and requested that no other works be reproduced alongside the texts. How many people are aware that the first edition of Robert Frank’s extraordinarily influential photo essay, The Americans, which is half a century old this year, was not published in United States but in Paris as Les Américains? The climate of the Cold War in those days was not conducive to finding an American publisher. Analyzing Frank’s significance today, in the light of the presidential campaign, Pamela M. Lee observes that “the book reads like an allegory of a lost highway, where the road is an endlessly shadowed one and each turn a leap of faith”.

In Christopher Wool’s and Wade Guyton’s art, painting has the appearance of being fraught with memory. The way in which Wool handles his work is, on the whole, ambivalent; it is evocative and yet also distanced, artfully plying the byways of authenticity between true and false. But a hint of truth keeps trickling out along the edges and through the cracks engendered by the tools of his art.

On the surface of things, Wade Guyton’s approach might appear to be more detached since he feeds the images and their supports directly into his Epson printer. The act of observation, the perception of the evolving work, and the potential of its evocative power are revealed with fascinating precision in Scott Rothkopf’s study of Guyton’s new “monochrome” works. Sculpture also features prominently in Guyton’s oeuvre. Mirrors, steel tube chairs, parquet cubes, and U-shaped steel objects reflect space, stretching it and compressing it to extremes, while also directly addressing, if not even attacking viewers with a clearcut YOU. This volume also features an Insert project by Kerstin Brätsch.

Is the fact that the collaboration artists in this issue are three male New Yorkers even worth mentioning? Yes, it is, inasmuch as the next issue of Parkett will be devoted to three women. As always, the collaborating artists for the next issue are listed on the inside flap of the back cover.