Books
view all

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Super Creeps. Cruising through the Work of Kai Althoff

  • Author: Oliver Koerner von Gustorf
  • Artist: Kai Althoff
  • Section: Collaboration

The Ties That Bind

  • Author: Jordan Kantor
  • Artist: Kai Althoff
  • Section: Collaboration

With Bellbottoms in the Underworld

  • Author: Veit Loers
  • Artist: Kai Althoff
  • Section: Collaboration

He Paints Paint

  • Author: Jennifer Higgie
  • Artist: Glenn Brown
  • Section: Collaboration

Master and Minion

  • Author: Jörg Heiser
  • Artist: Glenn Brown
  • Section: Collaboration

New Worlds for Old. The Fantastic Voyage of Glenn Brown

  • Author: Trevor Smith
  • Artist: Glenn Brown
  • Section: Collaboration

Monster Mash

  • Author: Jan Avgikos
  • Artist: Dana Schutz
  • Section: Collaboration

Under Close Observation

  • Author: Brian Sholis
  • Artist: Dana Schutz
  • Section: Collaboration

Welcome to Neverland

  • Author: Katrin Wittneven
  • Artist: Dana Schutz
  • Section: Collaboration

Between the Book and the Lamp. Four Projects by Rémy Markowitsch

  • Author: Angelika Affentranger-Kirchrath
  • Artist: Rémy Markowitsch
  • Section: Miscellaneous / Varia

Tea with Grayson Perry

  • Author: Duncan Fallowell
  • Artist: Grayson Perry
  • Section: Miscellaneous / Varia

Sturtevant: Inappropriate Appropriation

  • Author: Michael Lobel
  • Artist: Sturtevant
  • Section: Miscellaneous / Varia

Goodbye Johnny. Johannes Gachnang, 1939–2005

  • Author: Rudolf Schmitz
  • Artist: Johannes Gachnang
  • Section: Balkon

Experiencing Duration. The 2005 Lyon Biennal

  • Author: Gianfranco Maraniello
  • Section: Cumulus

Pun to Paradox. Bas Jan Ader Revisited

  • Author: Rachel Kent
  • Artist: Bas Jan Ader
  • Section: Cumulus

$ 32.00

Introduction

Kai Althoff, Glenn Brown, and Dana Schutz invite us with deliberate guile to enter into highly idiosyncratic personal worlds and wide-ranging universes of their own creation. They put their faith in the power of the image—though, as Oliver Koerner von Gustorf observes, there is talk at times of a framework that is not interdisciplinary, but rather antidisciplinary. Glenn Brown and Dana Schutz apply themselves to the “master discipline” of oil painting with bravura but only as a platform for corrosive flights of fancy that transport it into another dimension. Glenn Brown burrows into “the genre of painting” in order to embark on what might be called a subcutaneous journey into his Musée Imaginaire. His steady companion is a great delight in deception of all kinds: travesties of eras past and present, trompe l’oeil in the perfectly flat rendition of pastose brushstrokes, or the gradual liquefaction of false trails. The neo-rococo excrescence on the cover is the quintessential embodiment of all heads that have ever taken up residence on a cover or a canvas, and which now dissolves before our very eyes into a froth of saturated colors. The implications of a treatment of time that borrows from the workings of fairy tales and casually unites centuries, decades, and generations is fleshed out in Veit Loers essay on the work of Kai Althoff. All three collaboration artists share an aspect aptly described in Jan Avgikos’ analysis of the work of Dana Schutz. Her painting is, as she puts it, an “almost encyclopedic archive of nightmarish and sensational imagery” that nonetheless shows a “life-enhancing optimism” in its “fictional post-apocalyptic setting”. While Schutz’s images graphically lay bare existential extremes in the life situations of society’s castaways, Kai Althoff accosts us with other extremes, backdrops of gloom, such as the diabolical dimensions of German history. As in science fiction, Glenn Brown operates on a more concentrated level of materiality in his deliciously uncanny, liquefied world.

The obvious, self-evident presence of the Apocalypse in the work of these three artists is, paradoxically, what makes their projects so exhilaratingly inviting and, indeed, liberating. Also in this volume an Insert by Balthasar Burkhard.