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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Classic Cruelty

  • Author: Keith Seward
  • Artist: Vanessa Beecroft
  • Section: Collaboration

Let the Picture Do the Talking

  • Author: Jan Avgikos
  • Artist: Vanessa Beecroft
  • Section: Collaboration

Parades

  • Author: Pier Luigi Tazzi
  • Artist: Vanessa Beecroft
  • Section: Collaboration

US Navy SEALs

  • Author: Norman Bryson
  • Artist: Vanessa Beecroft
  • Section: Collaboration

An American in Paris

  • Author: Thomas Kellein
  • Artist: Ellsworth Kelly
  • Section: Collaboration

Forever in the Present

  • Author: Simon Maurer
  • Artist: Ellsworth Kelly
  • Section: Collaboration

Why Kelly Now?

  • Author: David Rimanelli
  • Artist: Ellsworth Kelly
  • Section: Collaboration

“To Hell with Pictures”. Ellsworth Kelly’s Walls

  • Author: Briony Fer
  • Artist: Ellsworth Kelly
  • Section: Collaboration

4166 Sea View Lane

  • Author: Kate Bush
  • Artist: Jorge Pardo
  • Section: Collaboration

Off the Table

  • Author: Camiel van Winkel
  • Artist: Jorge Pardo
  • Section: Collaboration

The Tonality of Contradictory Settings

  • Author: Christina Végh
  • Artist: Jorge Pardo
  • Section: Collaboration

What Is Lost for Art Is Gained for Life

  • Author: Russell Ferguson
  • Artist: Jorge Pardo
  • Section: Collaboration

“Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters”. Jorge Pardo and the Human Scale

  • Author: Frank Frangenberg
  • Artist: Jorge Pardo
  • Section: Collaboration

We Go Round and Round in the Night and Are Consumed by Fire

  • Author: Greg Hilty
  • Artist: Cerith Wyn Evans
  • Section: Miscellaneous / Varia

Indexicality Concrète. The Aesthetic Politics of Christian Marclay’s Gramopho…

  • Author: Thomas Y. Levin
  • Artist: Christian Marclay
  • Section: Miscellaneous / Varia

Diana Thater: On Location

  • Author: Lynne Cooke
  • Artist: Diana Thater
  • Section: Miscellaneous / Varia

Civilization and Its Discontents. Architectural Dialogue One

  • Author: Diane Lewis
  • Section: Les Infos du Paradis

Art Rules

  • Author: Adrian Dannatt
  • Section: Cumulus

Prague 2000

  • Author: Petr Nedoma
  • Section: Cumulus

$ 32.00

Introduction

Modern Art—Modern Life “Aesthetic,” “modern”: At the end of this century, no two words radiate such an aura, no two words are so redolent of the great intellectual achievements of an outgoing epoch and yet so pregnant with the shrill banality of consumerist reality’s utilitarian values. Aesthetics, the imperial discipline of philosophy, is challenged today more than ever by a rampantly accelerating and changing “modern global culture,” in which the field most suitable for reflection seems to be undergoing constant growth. In the present volume of Parkett, we invite readers to embark on an exciting journey back and forth between art and the everyday, in which any certainties about a momentary destination are promptly undermined. The fundamental issues of art may be pursued with great subtlety in the paintings of Ellsworth Kelly, who, as Briony Fer observes, makes the wall a mutely eloquent partner of his works, or with striking audacity in Vanessa Beecroft’s latest coup in which she has acquisitioned an elite troup of the US-Army as her artistic material. The excitement of Ellsworth Kelly’s work is enhanced by his special position within the history of American abstract art, which has made a fetish of the ideas of purity and autonomy. Twice in the present issue readers enjoy an inside view of the New York Guggenheim. The one picture shows Ellsworth Kelly’s 1997 retrospective, mentioned with enthusiastic acclaim more than once in the articles that follow, while the other presents Vanessa Beecroft’s tableau vivant of young semi-clothed and nude women in her SHOW of 1998 at the same venue. Modernism as a lifestyle: contradiction or logical consequence? Jorge Pardo shows great determination in confronting us with this issue. One of his works is titled 4166 SEA VIEW LANE, the address of his own house in Los Angeles, which he built together with an architect. Last fall he „detoured“ visitors of the MOCA to his home, which made Kate Bush wonder whether it was „a public sculpture, a piece of architecture, a DIY house, a case study, a satellite exhibition space, a museum commission, or Jorge Pardo’s home?“ (from the editorial by Bice Curiger, Editor-in-Chief)